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BLOG: Youth Voice: What do Young People Want from Employers? Dec 2016

Learning to Leap

Often, these events are filled with seasoned speakers who are practitioners, opinion-formers, policy-makers and decision-makers from organisations involved in the specific topic. And, yes, this was no different in that respect. Yet, refreshingly, the day was also heavily influenced by the testament of today’s youth. It came in the form of both podium speeches and roundtable facilitation and feedback.

BLOG: Does the Path to Serving Rural Youth Lead to Adults First? Dec 2016

Making Cents International

The challenge of youth unemployment continues to garner headlines. Recently, the New York Times described the demographic challenge as, “The World Has a Problem: Too Many Young People.”[1] These headlines have galvanized interest in youth and led governments and donors to re-focus their efforts on employing this growing population. Youth-inclusive financial efforts have expanded as well, aimed at providing youth with the credit and savings services necessary to facilitate their “earning and learning.”

BLOG: How to Design Youth Employment Programs, Dec 2016

World Bank

After three and half years of work, we have finally completed our systematic review of youth employment programs. Many thanks to the co-authors who did the heavy lifting (Jose Manuel Romero, Jonathan StöterauFelix Weidenkaff and Marc Witte). The paper was presented at our recent Jobs and Development Conference. The team went over 40,000 papers to eventually find 103 that reported on credible impact evaluations of youth employment programs. These were more-or-less equally focused on high and middle/low income countries. These studies were codified in detail, including programs’ design features so that we could understand why some worked and others did not.

BLOG: In Zambia, Agribusiness Creates Potential for Job Growth, Dec 2016

World Bank

Zambia is currently under pressure to increase the pace of the economic transformation to create more productive jobs. Despite rapid economic growth from 2000-2013, the country is struggling to provide the kind of jobs needed to help spur sustainable growth and development.  The landlocked country is also one of Africa’s youngest countries by median age, and youth (aged 15-24) who are a significant and increasing share of the working population, are finding it hard to get jobs.

BLOG: Making the Future of Work More Inclusive and Equitable, Dec 2016

World Bank

There is much speculation about what share of jobs might be automated by increasingly smart machines. One estimate suggests that countries such as the U.S. would see almost half of today’s jobs disappearing, while another estimate suggests that this might be just about one in ten jobs. But less is known about who will lose their jobs due to these transitions. And more critically, what might happen to the bottom 40 percent of the population of emerging countries that have only recently been exposed to basic digital technologies? Will they gain from technological progress, or will they face the negative effects of both exclusion and of others—countries or the better off—pulling ahead?

BLOG: How Slatecube is Solving Nigeria's Unemployment Problem, Dec 2016

News Week

In August, when Chris Kwekowe met Bill Gates during a television interview that featured some of Africa’s brightest young entrepreneurs, he didn’t ask the Microsoft founder for a job or business advice. Instead, the 23-year-old Nigerian told Gates how he had turned down a software engineer role at Microsoft.“[Gates] was really intrigued, and he smiled,” says Kwekowe, 23. “After the program, all the directors were like, ‘Dude, you mean you actually turned down a job at Microsoft and had the guts to tell Bill Gates ?”

BLOG: Can the Mobile Phone Call Youth Back to the Farm? Dec 2016

Next Billion

According to online media over recent years, youth are fleeing farms across the developing world. Young people report that they view agriculture as a dirty job, one that’s unattractive, risky and low-paying. They feel there’s little access to the financial services, information and communication tools required to excel in the field. These beliefs are often exacerbated by their parents, who expect that sending their children to school will automatically lead to less labor-intensive jobs.

Opinion: Why is Demand-Driven Training Like a Long-term Marriage?, Dec 2016

Fiona Macaulay, Devex

By demand-driven training, I mean those skills development initiatives that are customized to respond directly to specific requirements of a job role for an employer or a group of employers and place trainees into a job. I have taken a deep dive over the past five years into understanding what’s different about “demand-driven training” for disadvantaged young adults compared to other workforce development initiatives. For the demand-driven training model to work, training providers must have corporate partners ready to invest time and effort to align their values and objectives, overcome differences, and find ways to work well together.

BLOG: Start-up Culture is Corrupting Our Youth and Killing Real Entrepreneurship, Nov 2016

Telegraph UK

Hundreds of thousands of British youngsters are about to flood the entrepreneurship market. According to UnLtd, more than half of young people posses the ambition of starting their own company, which translates to unprecedented growth in the number of companies run by those youngsters. In pursuit of the dream perpetuated by start-up culture, they are equipped with revolutionary ideas such as a condom key chain and a "social media site which, unlike Facebook, would finally allow us to see who visited our page and thus identify obsessive followers"

BLOG: Elumenu Urges African Youth to Inculcate Entrepreneurship, Nov 2016

News Ghana

The Founder of the Tony Elumelu Foundation, Tony Elumelu says Africa’s quest for breaking the cycle of poverty and dependency could only be achieved if it injects the spirit of entrepreneurship into its youthful population. To this end, his Foundation has set up the TEF Entrepreneurship Programme, which is a 10-year programme worth $ 100 million to identify, train, mentor and fund 10,000 entrepreneurs, capable of changing the face of business across Africa.

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