FULL LIST OF MONITORING & EVALUATION

This cross-cutting theme focuses on improving the effectiveness, sustainability, and scale of programs by sharing data on what works and what doesn’t, and methodologies for monitoring, evaluation, and impact assessment.   Improved practices in this area promise to provide stakeholders with enhanced understanding of which interventions have meaningful impact, what the likely return on investment will be, and how to design and implement improved monitoring and evaluation initiatives.

Where are we now?

As the YEO field matures, pilot programs and anecdotal data have given way to increasingly sophisticated approaches to program measurement and learning. These advances are critical to scale, replication, policy and government partnership initiatives. However, more work remains. Confusion about the purpose and practice of monitoring, evaluation and assessment, and the way it can contribute to learning with an organization or program still exists.  A common language for this area along with standardized measures of cost and benefit are also necessary to ensure discussions are productive and evaluations reflect a common framework of practice.

Trends and emerging practices

  • Donors are advocating for more rigorous evaluation to ensure greater accountability and learning.
  • Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard, they can be expensive and time consuming, leading some donors to find quasi-experimental and impact evaluations very appealing, while others invest more significantly in M&E activities.
  • For corporations and foundations, evaluations are important to measure the social value proposition and social impact of their investments to consumers, customers, and employees.
  • More implementers are recognizing the importance of investing in good M&E, so they can demonstrate to donors their organization's social value proposition, particularly to impact investors.
  • More organizations are successfully using mixed methods approaches (both quantitative and qualitative data) to M&E.
  • Survey and focus group tools should be tested and finalized with young people for tools to achieve greater reliability and validity.
  • Data from young people should be triangulated with data from significant adults in their lives (such as parents, guardians, and teachers) to contextualize its meaning and importance.
  • More organizations are recognizing that existing M&E staff may not have the skills set required to engage young people, so training on how to conduct youth-inclusive M&E is important. 
  • Young people are not homogeneous, so questions need to be framed differently for young men and young women, youth from urban and rural communities, and/or youth from different socio-economic groups.

 

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Measuring Soft Skills & Life Skills in International Youth Development Programs: A Review and Inventory of Tools

YouthPower Action

In recent years, as the evidence base on the importance of soft and life skills for fostering positive youth outcomes has grown, international youth development programs have increasingly focused on interventions that develop those skills (also referred to as socioemotional skills, transferrable skills, non-cognitive skills, and developmental assets, among other terms).

Assessment of Integrated Workforce Development and Sexual and Reproductive Health Interventions with Recommendations for the Future

FHI 360

Improving the lives of youth is critical to local, national, and international development. The needs of youth are complex and therefore broader than any one sector of development. Multisector programs that focus on the whole person are promising for having a greater impact on youth than single-sector approaches. More specifically, theoretical perspectives and evidence from research suggest that two sectors important for encouraging the well-being of youth — workforce development (WfD) and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) — are interrelated and mutually supportive.

What We Do and Do Not Know about Youth Employability: Round-Up of Recent Research and Insights

Center for Education Innovations

My interest in youth skills and employability began on the side of a mountain in rural China, where I taught English to a class of 7th graders at a rural boarding school. One statistic that I learned during my first week stuck with me: only about 40% of our school’s students would ultimately attend high school. I wondered what was in store for the other 60%.

The State of Evidence on the Impact of Transferable Skills Programming on Youth in Low and Middle-Income Countries

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation

Young people make up the majority of the world’s population, and the majority of those young people are in the developing world (USAID 2012). Educators recognize that the skills a person needs to succeed in today’s world are more than just reading, writing, and arithmetic. Transferable skills are higher-order cognitive skills and non-cognitive skills that individuals can use to be successful across different situations in work and life.

What's Trending for Global Education Diplomacy?

Diplomatic Courier

While education has for years been at the forefront of the global development and social agendas, its place on the diplomatic agenda has arguably been less prominent.  As such, ’Education Diplomacy’ is an idea whose time has come.

Rapid Market Assessment of Key Sectors for Women and Youth in Zimbabwe

International Labour Organization

This Rapid Market Assessment (RMA) was conducted at the request of the ILO to support the design and development of a 3-year project funded by the African Development Bank (AfDB) and scheduled to run from 2017-2019 in Zimbabwe. The project aims to support women and youth in rural livelihoods to generate better and more sustainable income and employment opportunities by strengthening production and value-addition in a number of key rural economic sectors.

Scaling Demand-Driven Training Programs: A Framework

Making Cents International

“Building Inclusive Economies, where more people have access to more opportunities, equal shots at success, and the freedom to dene what success looks like for themselves” is a pillar of the Rockefeller Foundation's work. By 2050, 400 million young people in Africa will need sustainable employment opportunities, while national labor markets are struggling to keep up with this youth bulge.

Economic Prospects for Global Youth

ORGANIZER: 
CGAP & Citi Foundation
DATE: 
May 2, 2017 (12:00pm to 01:00pm)
Young people currently make up the largest youth population in history, and throughout the world they face a common challenge: persistent youth unemployment. Citi Foundation, a CGAP member, is investing $100 million globally over the next three years as part of its Pathways to Progress program to prepare 500,000 young people ages 16-24 for today's competitive job market.
 

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