Economic Empowerment

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

BLOG: Workforce Development: A shift into high gear

This year’s Workforce Development Track of the Making Cents conference saw more than a tenfold increase in proposal submissions and will feature a record number of panelists across nine distinct workforce themed panels. The lineup of proposals and participants provides terrific insight into the range and diversity of workforce issues that the development community and countries at large are grappling with, including public private partnerships, work-based learning interventions, soft-skills measurement, technology applications, career development practices and mentorship programs.     

Why Companies are Investing in the Skill and Potential of Arab Youth

Originally published by International Youth Foundation on February 25, 2015

Telling a New Story of Zimbabwe's Youth

Originally published by International Youth Foundation on February 25, 2015

How Comics are Helping WalMart Prepare 200K Women for Work

Originally published by International Youth Foundation on February 25, 2015

Youth Savings Patterns and Performance in Colombia, Ghana, Kenya, and Nepal

The project is an initiative of the YouthSave Consortium led by Save the Children (SC) in partnership with the Center for Social Development (CSD) at Washington University in St. Louis, the New America Foundation, and the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP). Research partners (RPs) in the field include Universidad de los Andes in Colombia, Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER) at the University of Ghana, Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA), and New ERA in Nepal.

Resource Type: 
Report

National Opportunity Summit

Event host(s)/organization(s): 
Opportunity Nation
Event Date: 
Feb 25, 2015 (All day) to Feb 26, 2015 (All day)

The National Opportunity Summit on February 25-26, 2015 in Washington, D.C. will unite a bipartisan, cross-sector group of business leaders, nonprofits, elected officials, and young people around the urgent crisis of youth unemployment and its impact on opportunity in America.

The Summit will feature proven solutions that can be taken to scale, powerful examples of collaboration that are equipping youth to succeed, chances to network and build partnerships across sectors, and a call to action we will all take forward from the event.

The Future of Youth Employment

The workplace landscape for disadvantaged youth in the United States is more precarious than it has been at any other time in the past eighty years. According to a June 2013 report by the Center for American Progress, 22.5 percent of teens ages 16 to 19 are unemployed, and 1.4 million teens are neither enrolled in school nor working. Young people in general can have a hard time positioning themselves with employers due to age, shortage of experience and maturity, and lack of education and skills. Certain subpopulations face even greater barriers due to factors including race, sex, and socioeconomic status.

Resource Type: 
Report

Reassessing Soft Skills for Work Readiness

Event host(s)/organization(s): 
Workforce Connections
Event Date: 
Mar 12, 2015 (All day)

The Workforce Connections team including Child Trends and FHI 360 will be presenting a session on "Reassessing Key "Soft Skills" for Work Readiness: Priorities for Global Humanistic Education" at the 2015 Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society. The session will be presented by Laura Lippman of Child Trends, Rachel Carney of Child Trends, Kristin Brady of FHI 360 and Jacqueline Karau, Youth Representative.

Including Childcare in Youth Employment Projects

In many settings, women are the primary childcare providers, and motherhood begins during adolescence. For young mothers without strong family and social support systems, lack of affordable childcare can prevent them from participating in youth employment projects. Accessible childcare services can increase young women’s participation rates in training, their productivity (in terms of decreased absenteeism and retention), and there may also be benefits for children’s development outcomes.

Resource Type: 
Report

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