FULL LIST OF ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

BLOG: Workforce Development: A shift into high gear

RTI

This year’s Workforce Development Track of the Making Cents conference saw more than a tenfold increase in proposal submissions and will feature a record number of panelists across nine distinct workforce themed panels. The lineup of proposals and participants provides terrific insight into the range and diversity of workforce issues that the development community and countries at large are grappling with, including public private partnerships, work-based learning interventions, soft-skills measurement, technology applications, career development practices and mentorship programs.     

GUIDE: Youth Guide to the Global Goals, Dec 2016

Youth Service America

The SDGs build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and aim to go further to end all forms of poverty. The new Goals are unique in that they call for action by all countries - regardless of income - to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and addresses a range of social needs including education, health, social protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection.

REPORT: 2016 Report on the World Social Situation, Dec 2016

United Nations

Humankind has achieved unprecedented social progress over the past several decades. Poverty has declined dramatically around the world and people are healthier, more educated and better connected than ever before. However, this progress has been uneven. Social and economic inequalities persist and, in many cases, have worsened. Virtually everywhere, some individuals and groups confront barriers that prevent them from fully participating in economic, social and political life. Against this backdrop, inclusiveness and shared prosperity have emerged as core aspirations of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

Resource Type: 
Report

Global Youth Development Index and Report, October 2016

Commonwealth Secretariat

With 1.8 billion people between the ages of 15 and 29, the world is home to more young people today than ever before. Close to 87 per cent of them live in developing countries. Young people make up approximately one quarter of humanity, but in many countries, especially in South Asia and Africa, one in three people is a young person. Demographic trends and projections make it clear that the proportion of young people in the global population is declining and it is predicted to fall below 20 per cent by 2075. The next few decades, therefore, are an unprecedented window of opportunity for the world, and developing countries in particular, to reap the promise of this ‘demographic dividend’.

Resource Type: 
Report

BLOG: Andrea Leadsom is Right – We Need to get More Young People into Farming, Oct 2016

The Telegraph UK

When recently appointed Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom suggested that young Britons could take over post-Brexit fruit-picking and farm labour, her comments were met with derision. Speaking at a Conservative Party conference fringe event in Birmingham, she said she hoped that more young people could be “encouraged to engage with countryside matters”, and that “the concept of a career in food production is going to be much more appealing going forward.”

BLOG: 10 Lessons in 10 Years: Building the Youth Economic Opportunities Sector, Oct 2016

Making Cents International

A decade ago, I organized the first-ever global convening with the singular focus on how to increase the scale and sustainability of the youth economic opportunities sector. Fast forward ten years, to this past September, when 543 people from 53 countries gathered to share their knowledge, and celebrate the 10th anniversary of this event: The Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit. Clearly, we were on to something big. 

PROJECT: Youh Global Programme for Sustainable Development & Peace, Oct 2016

United Nations Development Programme

The project aims to systematically foster youth empowerment where UNDP has a presence by significantly boosting the implementation of UNDP's Youth Strategy 2014-2017 (itself aligned with UNDP’s Strategic Plan 2014-2017) and to sharpen the organization’s focus and corporate response to the challenges young people face worldwide across three priority thematic areas: enhanced youth civic engagement and participation in decision making and political processes and institutions; increased economic empowerment of youth; and strengthened youth engagement in resilience- and peace-building.

PRESENTATION: African Youth Engagement Goes Viral Discuss with Young Leaders How to Create Economically Engaged Youth Networks, Sep 2016

Umsizi Fund, CIYOTA, Ongoza, Darecha Limited

The scale of the youth unemployment challenge is vast; we need to shift mindsets from the bottom up. Youth need to see new paths, opportunities and role models that encourage initiative and livelihood development. Youth leaders of the African Leadership Academy replicate "solution seeking" leadership training with youth throughout the African continent. What is working as near peers help youth develop 21st century skills and launch business ventures?

Resource Type: 
Presentation

BLOG: Here Come the Young, September 2016

Foreign Policy

While countries across Europe and East Asia are grappling with declining birthrates and aging populations, societies across the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia are experiencing youth booms of staggering proportions: More than half of Egypt’s labor force is younger than age 30. Half of Nigeria’s population of 167 million is between the ages of 15 and 34. In Afghanistan, Angola, Chad, East Timor, Niger, Somalia, and Uganda, more than two-thirds of the population is under the age of 25.

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