Economic Empowerment

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

BLOG: Workforce Development: A shift into high gear

This year’s Workforce Development Track of the Making Cents conference saw more than a tenfold increase in proposal submissions and will feature a record number of panelists across nine distinct workforce themed panels. The lineup of proposals and participants provides terrific insight into the range and diversity of workforce issues that the development community and countries at large are grappling with, including public private partnerships, work-based learning interventions, soft-skills measurement, technology applications, career development practices and mentorship programs.     

Kenya, U.S. Can Help Youth Get Jobs

Originally posted by The Rockefeller Foundation on July 25, 2015

When the African youth population doubles to 400 million, there will be more young people entering the workforce than there are jobs waiting for them.

In Kenya, up to 80% of their 2.5 million youth are unemployed, while youth unemployment in the U.S. is three times the jobless rate.

#YouthEO Twitter Chat: Scale in Practice

There are over 1.1 billion young people in the world who need to be able to find good jobs, start and grow businesses, gain access to appropriate financial services and overall, participate in the global economy.But how can development practitioners and private and public sector actors meet the growing demand for youth economic opportunity? 

Competition: TVET for the 21st Century in Africa | The Most Promising Practices on the African Continent

Do you work with a technical vocational education and training (TVET) program in Africa that is delivering skills for the 21st century?

Do you work with a TVET program in Africa whose students are finding jobs and becoming successful entrepreneurs?

Do you work with a TVET program in Africa that is demand-driven and employer-led?

Competition is open from August 1 – 31, 2015
Go To www.wfconnections.org

Workforce Development Programming: Economic Strengthening and Adolescent Girls

Event host(s)/organization(s): 
SEEP Network
Event Date: 
Aug 5, 2015 (09:30am to 11:00am)

Welcome to a new series of webinars focusing on economic strengthening programming designed to reach and engage adolescent youth in economic and financial activity, with a special focus on girls. 

July E-Bulletin: Smart Investments to Expand Youth Economic Opportunity

Making Cents International offers this newsletter for the donors, policy makers, corporations, researchers, implementers and youth leaders increasing the scale, sustainability and effectiveness of youth economic inclusion programming. 

The Digital Jobs Africa Network: Increasing Effectiveness through Knowledge Exchange

Making Cents International is forming and facilitating a network of organizations who offer demand-driven training for digital jobs and job placement to disadvantaged, high potential youth. The network is comprised of 16 of The Rockefeller Foundation’s Digital Jobs Africa (DJA) grantees and partners in Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. The network kicked off in October 2014.

How can we fix ‘DIS’ system? Approaches to the Demand, Intermediation and Supply Nexus of Youth Employment Projects

Part 1: Why project implementers should move to the backseat and let their partners take the wheel: an example from Bosnia’s IT sector 

Introduction

Youth at Work: Building Economic Opportunities for Young People in Africa

Generating viable employment for young people remains a serious global problem. This situation is particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa, where some 600 million people are currently under the age of 25. Many still do not have access to quality and reliable economic opportunities, either through self- or formal employment. The economic and social costs of this challenge are too high. It is time for the global youth jobs movement to take its work to a new level—a level that will create new economic opportunity for millions of young people.

Resource Type: 
Report

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