FULL LIST OF GLOBAL

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

BLOG: Workforce Development: A shift into high gear

RTI

This year’s Workforce Development Track of the Making Cents conference saw more than a tenfold increase in proposal submissions and will feature a record number of panelists across nine distinct workforce themed panels. The lineup of proposals and participants provides terrific insight into the range and diversity of workforce issues that the development community and countries at large are grappling with, including public private partnerships, work-based learning interventions, soft-skills measurement, technology applications, career development practices and mentorship programs.     

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

BLOG: Youth Voice: What do Young People Want from Employers? Dec 2016

Learning to Leap

Often, these events are filled with seasoned speakers who are practitioners, opinion-formers, policy-makers and decision-makers from organisations involved in the specific topic. And, yes, this was no different in that respect. Yet, refreshingly, the day was also heavily influenced by the testament of today’s youth. It came in the form of both podium speeches and roundtable facilitation and feedback.

BLOG: Does the Path to Serving Rural Youth Lead to Adults First? Dec 2016

Making Cents International

The challenge of youth unemployment continues to garner headlines. Recently, the New York Times described the demographic challenge as, “The World Has a Problem: Too Many Young People.”[1] These headlines have galvanized interest in youth and led governments and donors to re-focus their efforts on employing this growing population. Youth-inclusive financial efforts have expanded as well, aimed at providing youth with the credit and savings services necessary to facilitate their “earning and learning.”

PROGRAM: WYSE Leadership Programme 2017 in Brazil, Dec 2016

WYSE International

Our International Leadership Programmes take the form of a 12 day intensive training, where participants from many different cultures, religions and socio-economic backgrounds come together to form an international learning community. The programme provides an opportunity to experiment with new models, creating a holistic view of the world we live in that is underpinned by the need for shared values and an awareness of our ultimate interconnection.

BLOG: How to Design Youth Employment Programs, Dec 2016

World Bank

After three and half years of work, we have finally completed our systematic review of youth employment programs. Many thanks to the co-authors who did the heavy lifting (Jose Manuel Romero, Jonathan StöterauFelix Weidenkaff and Marc Witte). The paper was presented at our recent Jobs and Development Conference. The team went over 40,000 papers to eventually find 103 that reported on credible impact evaluations of youth employment programs. These were more-or-less equally focused on high and middle/low income countries. These studies were codified in detail, including programs’ design features so that we could understand why some worked and others did not.

BLOG: Making the Future of Work More Inclusive and Equitable, Dec 2016

World Bank

There is much speculation about what share of jobs might be automated by increasingly smart machines. One estimate suggests that countries such as the U.S. would see almost half of today’s jobs disappearing, while another estimate suggests that this might be just about one in ten jobs. But less is known about who will lose their jobs due to these transitions. And more critically, what might happen to the bottom 40 percent of the population of emerging countries that have only recently been exposed to basic digital technologies? Will they gain from technological progress, or will they face the negative effects of both exclusion and of others—countries or the better off—pulling ahead?

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