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Seeking Youth Representative for the Workforce Connections Advisory Board - Apply by June 13

Purpose:

Workforce Connections seeks a youth representative for its Advisory Board – a group of thought leaders that will set research priorities, leverage funding for research, and provide links to key actors in WFD arena – in order to advance thinking on key technical themes for the field of international youth workforce development.

Background:

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Technology, teaching and learning – What can we learn from the evidence?

Event host(s)/organization(s): 
Tech Salon London
Event Date: 
Jul 25, 2014 (08:30am to 10:30am)

In August, the Department for International Development (DFID) will publish a new evidence paper exploring the relationship between education technology, teaching and learning in low and lower-middle income countries. Based on a review of over 80 studies, this paper aims to inform governments, NGOs, donors, the private sector and schools about how to use technology in schools by learning from the evidence.

17th Microcredit Summit, Generation Next: Innovations in Microfinance

Event host(s)/organization(s): 
Microcredit Summit Campaign
Event Date: 
Sep 3, 2014 (09:30am) to Sep 5, 2014 (05:30pm)

Our next Summit will be in Mérida, Mexico this September 3rd to 5th. We are excited to welcome the Ministry of the Economy (Mexico) and its National Microenterprise Financing Program (PRONAFIM) as our official partner for the 17th Microcredit Summit. (Learn more about PRONAFIM.)

Kiva at Four

This essay is a sequel to the case titled “Kiva and the Birth of Person-to-Person Microfinance,” published by the author in Innovations (Winter/Spring 2007). Started by the author, Jessica Jackley Flannery and Moses Onyango in 2005, Kiva is an online lending platform that allows individuals in the developed world to loan to small businesspeople in the developing world. Kiva operates in the microfinance space and works with a growing network of microfinance institutions (MFIs) in more than 40 countries.

Resource Type: 
Report

Kiva and the Birth of Person-to-Person Microfinance

Matt Flannery started Kiva in 2005 with his wife, Jessica. Kiva is an online lending platform that allows individuals in the developed world to loan to small business people in the developing world. Kiva operates in the microfinance space and works with a growing network of microfinance institutions (MFIs) in more than thirty countries. Their MFI partners post the profiles of their loan applicants to the website. Internet users in the United States, Canada, Europe, and beyond make small loans via PayPal to these businesses. The businesses pay the lenders back over a period of about a year.

Resource Type: 
Report

German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) -- NAMA Funding for Low-Carbon Development

Germany's BMU is a partner of the UK's Department of Energy and Climate Change in establishing the NAMA Facility to address climate change (promotion of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions). The Facility announces its second call for project proposals from national governments and qualified delivery organizations in developing and emerging economies. The NAMA Facility has no regional or sectoral focus, and it is open to fund NAMAs across a range of countries and sectors. The deadline for concept outlines (i.e., preliminary proposals) is 15 July 2014.

Entrepreneurs for Social Change: Call for applications now open

The United Nations Alliance of Civilizations is organizing a 7-day training in collaboration with Fondazione CRT and the Italian Government. The training will bring together 20 young people from the Euro-Mediterranean region to enhance the skills needed to boost a business idea with a social mission, and be a powerful motor of economic development and social inclusion.

Celebrating Progress, Remaining Steadfast and Asking What’s Next for Girls’ Education

Over the past two decades there have been major improvements in girls’ education. In 1990, less than 50 percent of girls in low-income countries were enrolled in primary school; today that figure has climbed to nearly 80 percent. However, much work remains to be done. Thirty million girls still miss out on basic education, and the challenge for those that now attend school is that they learn while there. Indeed, 250 million children cannot read or write, even after many of them have spent four years in school.

Resource Type: 
Video/Audio

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