FULL LIST OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Workforce development initiatives build the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that youth need to obtain and participate in productive work. Activities in this area strive to bring the private and public sector together to ensure that education improves both the workforce readiness and technical skills necessary for youth to participate in the world of work effectively.

Where are we now?

Workforce development as a field is hard to generalize due to its many different providers, approaches, and target populations, which range from universities educating highly-skilled medical personnel to community organizations providing basic literacy skills to out-of-school youth.  However, increasing global unemployment and events, such as the Arab Spring, have highlighted a common problem of these providers - their services have not kept pace with changes in the private sector, leading to widespread mismatches between skills available and those demanded. Practitioners are responding through a renewed emphasis on collaboration with the private sector to ensure that educational institutions and community organizations are providing demand-driven skills to students, while employers invest in improved on-the-job training to build the skills of new employees quickly and cost-effectively.

Trends and Best Practices

  • Private sector buy-in is critical in developing the programs that link young people to formal employment opportunities. When the private sector is an invested party with donors and social organizations, there is greater possibility for young people to access employment opportunities as they continuously develop their skills and knowledge.
  • Young people and their families are looking for programs that offer practical and hands on opportunities, such as apprenticeships with trade based companies or internships with companies or NGO's. Some programs offer voucher systems that cover the cost of the internships, which have been particularly successful for young women seeking employment in more conservative countries. Participation in workforce development programs often increases when these practical opportunities for relevant skills application are included.
  • Many vocational institutions are not best placed to develop the technical skills of young people given the high rate of change in technology and the challenges for these institutions to keep pace. The private sector, on the other hand, has to keep pace with the market to remain competitive and therefore offers an alternative housing of skills development offerings.
  • Historically, workforce development focused primarily on building technical skills required for a given trade. However, most programs now recognize the importance of incorporating work-readiness skills, including basic literacy, numeracy, and job conduct. If these skills are lacking, it will make their ability to function in the workplace and learn more specialized vocational skills very weak.
  • Creating employment opportunities is just as important as skills building and should encompass all types of employment – formal, informal, and self-employment. The latter two are particularly important for vulnerable populations, such as women and youth, who may be excluded from formal employment.

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

BLOG: Workforce Development: A shift into high gear

RTI

This year’s Workforce Development Track of the Making Cents conference saw more than a tenfold increase in proposal submissions and will feature a record number of panelists across nine distinct workforce themed panels. The lineup of proposals and participants provides terrific insight into the range and diversity of workforce issues that the development community and countries at large are grappling with, including public private partnerships, work-based learning interventions, soft-skills measurement, technology applications, career development practices and mentorship programs.     

Four Ways to Maximize the Effectiveness of Youth Employment Programs

World Bank

The youth employment challenge is a stubborn reality in all regions and nearly every country. Over 35 per cent of the estimated 201 million unemployed people today are youth (between the ages of 15 and 24).

Youth Engagement for Prosperity in Bangladesh

Plan International

I feel proud to represent Bangladesh and do it wherever I go. The 5th Asian Youth Forum - co-hosted by the Asian Development Bank and Plan International- was one of the biggest platforms where I had the opportunity to showcase the issues and potential of youth living in our country. In my view, youth are the backbone of a nation: we bring enthusiasm and dynamics not only to the population structure but also to the social structure. Focusing on the biological and social development of youth is vital for a nation to achieve its human development goals.

Does Sport-Based Workforce Training Work for At-Risk Youth in LAC?: Final Results from the A Ganar Randomized Control Trial in Honduras

ORGANIZER: 
USAID
DATE: 
Jun 23, 2017 (10:00am to 11:30am)

Social Impact will present final results of a USAID-funded six-year randomized control trial of the A Ganar workforce development program in Honduras. Implemented by Partners of the Americas, A Ganar uses sports-based life skills activities, vocational training, internships and follow-on support to combat youth unemployment.

African Economic Outlook 2017- Entrepreneurship and Industrialisation

African Development Bank, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, United Nations Development Programme

The annual African Economic Outlook (AEO) monitors the continent’s state of affairs using a collaborative approach. The AEO assesses the recent economic and social situation in Africa, projects likely developments for the near future and explores a special theme on the structure of African economies. The AEO 2017, the 16th edition, examines entrepreneurship and industrialisation in Africa. The report results from a unique partnership between three international organisations: the African Development Bank, the OECD Development Centre and the United Nations Development Programme.

Assessment of Integrated Workforce Development and Sexual and Reproductive Health Interventions with Recommendations for the Future

FHI 360

Improving the lives of youth is critical to local, national, and international development. The needs of youth are complex and therefore broader than any one sector of development. Multisector programs that focus on the whole person are promising for having a greater impact on youth than single-sector approaches. More specifically, theoretical perspectives and evidence from research suggest that two sectors important for encouraging the well-being of youth — workforce development (WfD) and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) — are interrelated and mutually supportive.

YouthConnekt Africa Sumit

ORGANIZER: 
YouthConnekt
DATE: 
Jul 19, 2017 (All day) to Jul 21, 2017 (All day)

Over the last decades, Africa has been experiencing rapid technological and economic development creating new opportunities for millions of people all over the continent. However, with more than 226 million people aged between 15-241 , Africa has the youngest population – and the highest youth unemployment rate (60%  ) – in the world.

Pages